Friday, October 26, 2007

Turkey Medallions Seared in Thai Butter

  • 1/4 C lime juice
  • 2 tsp minced fresh ginger
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 8oz boneless turkey breast cutlets (1/4" thick)
  • salt to taste
  • 4 tsp butter
  • 6 thinly cut lime slices
  • 2 Tbsp finely chopped fresh cilantro

1. In a small bowl, stir together the lime juice, ginger and sugar until the sugar dissolves; set aside.
2. Dry the turkey pieces with a paper towel and sprinkle them with the salt.
3. Place a heavy 8" or 10" nonstick skillet over high heat for 1 minute. Swirl in the butter. Quickly add the turkey. Cook for 3 minutes, turning as necessary, until the turkey is firm to the touch and browned on both sides, with no trace of pink in the thickest part.
4. Transfer the turkey to a warm serving plate. Pour the lime juice mixture into the skillet and cook for 30 seconds, or until it becomes syrupy and is reduced by half. Pour over the turkey. Garnish with the lime slices and cilantro. Serve immediately.

Old-Fashioned Chicken Macaroni Salad

  • 2/3 C uncooked elbow macaroni
  • 1/3 C frozen corn
  • 1 C cubed cooked chicken
  • 1/4 C sliced celery
  • 1 hard-cooked egg, chopped
  • 2 Tbsp chopped green pepper
  • 1 Tbsp chopped onion
  • 1/2 C mayonnaise
  • 2 tsp white vinegar
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/8 tsp pepper

1. Cook macaroni according to package directions; drain and rinse in cold water. Cook corn according to package directions, drain and cool.
2. In a serving bowl, combine the macaroni, corn, chicken, celery, egg, green pepper and onion. In a small bowl, combine the mayonnaise, vinegar, salt and pepper. Pour over salad and stir to coat. Cover and refrigerate for 2 hours before serving.


Robyn's notes: I chopped up extra green pepper for use in another recipe later, and I always make more hard-cooked eggs than I need. I used safflower mayonnaise for health reasons.

Thursday, October 25, 2007

About Bulgur

Bulgur is parboiled broken pieces of whole wheat. Middle Eastern cooks have developed a unique way of processing their wheat, which makes this grain cook quickly and retain essential nutrients. Whole kernels of wheat are steamed or parboiled and then cracked into small pieces. This process softens the wheat without removing the fiber-rich bran or the nutrient-rich germ.

Bulgur has a pleasantly mild, nutty flavor. The mild flavor goes well with stir-fries and curries. It is the chief ingredient in Middle Eastern tabbouleh (tabouli) and kibbeh. It's higher nutritional value makes it a good substitute for rice or couscous.

Look for bulgur at health food stores, Middle Eastern groceries and some supermarkets. Check the package or bin; fine-grain and medium-grain bulgur cook quickly, while coarse-grain bulgur must be cooked for a long time. Cracked wheat is not a good substitute.


Downsized Tabbouleh

Note: Yield is 1 serving, don't forget to double for 2!
  • 1/3 C medium-grain bulgur
  • 1/2 C water
  • pinch salt
  • 1 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 1/2 tsp olive oil
  • 1/4 C finely chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 1/2 tsp finely chopped fresh mint
  • 1/2 clove crushed garlic
  • 1/2 green onion
  • 1/2 medium tomato, cubed
  • 1/4 C cubed cucumbers
  • 2 Tbsp crumbled feta cheese

1. In a small saucepan, combine the bulgur, water and salt; bring the mixture to a boil over medium heat. Simmer for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the bulgur is tender and the water is absorbed. Fluff the bulgur with a fork and turn it into a mixing bowl to cool for 10 minutes.
2. Add the lemon juice, oil, parsley, mint and garlic. Toss well.
3. Cut the green onion, including the tender green part, into thin slices. Add the tomatoes, green onions and cucumbers to the bulgur and toss well.
4. Cover the tabbouleh and chill for several hours or overnight to blend the flavors. Serve sprinkled with the feta.

Yield: 1 serving

Robyn's notes: He thought this was 'awesome'. It was really easy and quick to make. There were too many ingredients that I'm not able to eat for me to try it.