Thursday, March 30, 2017

Syrian-Style Falafel

This is a shortened, at-home version, which takes advantage of canned chickpeas.  The true traditional falafel wouldn't stoop to such a convenience food.  Remember not to discard the rest of the chickpeas, there are other recipes here on the site that use the other half can, and the liquid they're canned in--aquafaba--is a great vegan egg replacement in things like meringue, mayonnaise, and some frostings.
  • 1/2 can chickpeas, drained
  • 1/4 C chopped onion
  • 1 Tbsp finely chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp coriander
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 2-3 Tbsp flour
  • olive oil
1.   Combine chickpeas, onion, parsley, garlic, salt, cumin, and coriander in food processor bowl.  Pulse until blended but not pureed.
2.  Add baking soda and 2 Tbsp of flour, and pulse.  The dough should form a ball but not stick to your hands.  Pulse in additional flour if necessary.  Turn into a bowl and refrigerate, covered, for 2-3 hours. 
3.  Form into walnut-size balls and flatten gently.  Heat oil in a deep skillet over medium-high heat and fry for 1-2 minutes per side, or until golden brown.  Drain on paper towels. 

Robyn's notes: I folded these into flatbread, with sliced tomato and cucumber, and some Tahini Dipping Sauce.  The baking soda is used because I use canned chickpeas.  Without it, the finished product would be mushy and unpleasant.  Watch me demonstrate this recipe on youtube!

*** 3 Stars: Good. At least one of us liked this enough for me to make it again, but not often

Tahini Dipping Sauce

  • 3 Tbsp tahini
  • 2 Tbsp water
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 1/2 tsp salt
1.  Whisk together tahini and water.  Add lemon juice and continue mixing, adding salt to taste.

Robyn's notes: added a needed touch to the flatbread sandwiches I made using Syrian-Style Falafel, but not exciting.  I didn't use the full amount of salt, didn't feel it was needed.  Made about 1/4 C total.

*** 3 Stars: Good. At least one of us liked this enough for me to make it again, but not often